Monday July 13, 2020 at Fishburners Event Space: Level 2, 155 Queen Street, Brisbane, Australia.

2019 Conference Agenda

9:00  Welcome Peter Robinson
PegaSys / ConsenSys
9:05  Key Note
Video, Slides
Marcus Foth
Queensland University of Technology
Real World Use Cases (1)
9:20  Introducing BeefLedger: A Design Driven Journey
– Some Observations

Video, Slides
Warrick Powell
BeefLedger
Blockchain technologies and supply chains sound like they are a match made in Heaven. The BeefLedger project is a “boots and all” application of blockchain technologies to the Australian red meat industry. Through our design-driven journey, we are learning the difference between Heaven and Earth. This paper describes elements of the journey, drawing lessons about user priorities, the grounded realities of industrial scale requirements and IOT interdictions and the potential of mechanism design to shape supply chain outcomes. Supply chain management and digitalised inventory control are mature technologies, and respecting this is imperative for industry adoption of blockchain’s potential. Blockchain as a dependable record of past events, forming a basis of common knowledge amongst actors that operate in low or non-trust environments, is but the beginning of the technology’s new frontiers insofar as supply chains are concerned.
9:50  Supply Chain Financing on Blockchain
Video, Slides
Richard McKeon
integratedCapital
The objective of the presentation is to examine the application and use of blockchain in the current Supply Chain Finance Industry. It will provide a brief discussion on what constitutes Supply Chain Finance and how conceptually Blockchain could be implemented. The presentation will examine real use cases from across the world and see what can be learned from them. Finally, the paper will outline some suggested ways to implement Supply Chain Financing on Blockchain now and trends for the future.
10:20  Moving From Fast Fashion to Ethical Fashion:
Provenance in the Fashion Industry

Video, Slides
Sallyanne Astill
Credentia
Michelle Forrester
University of Queensland
Near cost clothing, rapid turnaround of garments exploiting consumer appetites for inexpensive and disposable clothing has created the problem of fast fashion. Competition between factories for contracts has resulted in workers toiling in appalling conditions, along with inappropriate compensation. According to research, consumers will pay slightly more for ethically produced clothing manufactured in a safe environment by legally compensated workers. Sounds promising? If only this could be proven.
10:50  Morning tea
Legal Perspective
11:10  Supply Chain of custody on the blockchain and the Electronic Transactions Act
Video, Slides
Adrian McCullagh
Odmob Lawyers
The Electronic Transactions Act (ETA) deals with the use of electronic signatures to effect transactions. Part 2A was established in 2011 and it specifically deals with legal effectiveness of transactions/documents/records electronically signed through a software agent. With the advent of smart contract technology there needs to be some contractual framework that deals with governing law. In relation to chain of custody issues in supply chain mechanisms effected on a blockchain, these transactions need not be restricted to a single jurisdiction. In order to take advantage of the ETA the smart contract will need to have some governing law structures to ensure the smart contract and its effectiveness in interpreted under Australian law. The general misunderstood position is that code is law. Code is not law. All smart contract code must comply with some legal regime. Smart contracts do not exist in a legal vacuum. But how can the parties be confident that their expected smart contracts will be legally enforceable if the matter end up before a court. Further which court will have jurisdiction. This presentation will investigate the requirements of the ETA and jurisdictional requirements that could impact supply chain blockchain deployments.
11:40  Is this block a law or a rule? How to better understand the effect of your blockchain with a nudge.
Video, Slides
Lachlan Robb
Queensland University of Technology
Felicity Deane
Queensland University of Technology
Designers of blockchain solutions are currently afforded a certain degree of power, which is an area not often considered in the literature. Indeed, a common theme that emerges is the need to decide what is off-chain or immutably on-chain. To address this from a legal and economic perspective we explore the effects of placing regulatory information on a supply chain blockchain. We warn against moving towards overly ‘concrete architecture’ and suggest complementary off-chain solutions, such as Nudging.
Real World Use Cases (2)
12:10  Building Integrity in the Lithium and Tantalum
Supply Chain

Video, Slides
Hugo O’Connor
CSIRO’s Data61
As part of the Supply Chain Integrity Mission, a cross-organisational effort to address major challenges facing Australia through innovative science and technology, Data61 has been developing solutions to increase trustworthiness in supply chains with a focus on the Lithium and Tantalum supply chains. This presentation will outline work, supported by the Science and Industry Endowment Fund, to address this challenge.
12:40  Lunch
Application Design
13:25 Supply-chain Agnostic Blockchain Modelling
Video, Slides
Claudio Lisco
ConsenSys Solutions
Determining how to map supply chains to blockchains is a complex process. This talk describes generic blockchain patterns that can be used to map and track nearly any supply chain. Viant, a blockchain-based platform for modelling business processes and tracking assets, is used to demonstrate how to apply these patterns.
13:55 Blockchain, technological tool to optimize the
logistics chain of tourist operators in post-conflict zones of Colombia

Video, Slides
Oscar Eduardo Sarmiento Saavedra
Servicio Nacional de Aprendizaje – SENA
Willian Eduardo Mosquera Laverde
Universidad Cooperativa de Colombia
Juan Camilo Bohorquez Rodriguez
Servicio Nacional de Aprendizaje – SENA
Carlos Hernan Cruz Castro
Servicio Nacional de Aprendizaje – SENA
Blockchain can be implemented in tourist companies in post-conflict areas in Colombia. For this, it is based on the results obtained in previous investigations, where little office management was found and registration of the information, therefore, with block chains, the problem can be substantially improved and provide the necessary security to foreign tourists, tools are developed to diagnose the handling of information, to define systematization protocols and finally , provide a web tool that allows tour operators to optimize the management of their information, improve decision making and, therefore, aprotar to the development of the regions.
14:25  Enabling Supply Chains using Crosschain Transactions and Private Sidechains
Video, Slides
Peter Robinson
PegaSys / ConsenSys
Sandra Johnson
PegaSys / ConsenSys
Atomic Crosschain Transactions & Ethereum Private Sidechains are emerging technology which should allow supply chain users to provide selective transparency while maintaining selective privacy. This talk will briefly introduces the technology and then describes usages in the provenance, supply chain financing, logistics, and automated deal negotiation spaces.
14:55  Afternoon tea
Design & Ethical Challenges
15:10  When the buyer changes their mind: how smart contracts can help
Video, Slides
Warrick Powell
BeefLedger
Charles Turner-Morris
BeefLedger
From time to time, buyers change their mind. Sometimes, it’s because of changing market conditions. On other occasions, it’s driven by concerns about product veracity. Either way, non-payment results wherein disputes over product quality become central to re-negotiated price and payment conditions. The problem is the product is already sitting on the docks. Can Smart Contracts alleviate these kinds of disputes? We introduce a scenario “based on a true story” and seek the thoughts of conference attendees.
15:40 Blockchain-based Solutions for Traceability and Trust Management in Supply Chains
Video, Slides
Kamran Najeebullah
CSIRO’s Data61
Supply chains (SC) have become complex due to multiple stages of production, geographic distribution, and volume of transactions. Blockchain (BC) has the potential to improve SC traceability, auditability, and prove- nance. We propose: (i) ProductChain to promote food SC provenance using a permissioned BC, and (ii) TrustChain to track SC interactions and dynamically assign trust and reputation scores using a consortium BC based trust management framework.
Real World Use Cases (3)
16:10 Water Trading and Blockchain Technology
Video, Slides
Katrina Donaghy
Civic Ledger
Since the introduction of regulated water markets in Australia in 2000, the volume of Water Entitlement and Water Allocation trade has significantly increased. However, in recent times, the Australian water market has been criticised largely due to a lack of transparency and timely reporting on who is trading what, where and when. Further, reporting on trades is currently fragmented, may take weeks to be published, may not even appear on a public website, raising concerns that “fictitious” trades could be used to prop up the market in the wake of increased allocation announcements or rainfall. This presentation will unpack these challenges and introduce an end-to-end registration and trading system built around blockchain technology.
16:40 The rise of blockchain for port-related logistics
Video, Slides
Elnaz Irannezhad
University of Queensland
Blockchain technology has been identified globally as a potential tool to improve efficiency across port logistics by reducing costs caused by information asymmetries and to fundamentally transform the entire trade process. This paper aims to investigate the existing blockchain platforms, properties and challenges and specifically determines the inefficiencies is the status quo that can be managed with blockchain.
17:10  Closing Peter Robinson
PegaSys / ConsenSys
17:15 Conference Ends

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